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To stud track or not - looking for advice

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Trying to decide whether or not to stud the track on two new sleds. Mainly do trail riding with a little (very little) back country stuff. Any thoughts or advice is appreciated.

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I trail ride and pic my sleds, trails get icy, it sucks when you are going up a icy hill and your track spins because of no pics.

Edited by Polaris05

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Trying to decide whether or not to stud the track on two new sleds. Mainly do trail riding with a little (very little) back country stuff. Any thoughts or advice is appreciated.

I have an 06 with 7500 miles no studs, only a few times I wished I had them but was able to get around even on those days, but mostly don't miss them at all especially don't miss sending them thru the heat exchanger

Edited by REV-ED

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Have a suggestion... I have a 2000 Pantera 800 triple...Never picked, and only a few times did I have a problem with Ice Hill... Many Maine rider's don't Pick tracks ( alot of snow ) ... quite a few in North Country don't pick tracks . I'd try it with out them, see how you like it a month or so...and go from there. It's pretty easy to pick a track later on... even then the 96 staggered up middle would be sufficent ...

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Trying to decide whether or not to stud the track on two new sleds. Mainly do trail riding with a little (very little) back country stuff. Any thoughts or advice is appreciated.

Depends a lot on where you ride and how you ride. If you are up north more, where conditions are better and less icy, then you can probably get away without them but if you spend time on lakes and down south, putting studs in is a pretty good idea. Like someone else said....try it without first and see if it's acceptable, that way you are not wasting time and money. :good:

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Back in the day, I did not use studs. As I rode more and more in many varied conditions over the whole winter season; I found them to be very valuable for maintaining control in less than perfect trail conditions.

If you are careful and do not ride in the early or late season, then you MAY not need them. :dunno: I would rather have them and not need them, than need them and not have them. Sort of like insurance, a firearm, survival tools, etc. just in case. :good:

Mark :drinks:

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Back in the day, I did not use studs. As I rode more and more in many varied conditions over the whole winter season; I found them to be very valuable for maintaining control in less than perfect trail conditions.

If you are careful and do not ride in the early or late season, then you MAY not need them. :dunno: I would rather have them and not need them, than need them and not have them. Sort of like insurance, a firearm, survival tools, etc. just in case. :good:

Mark :drinks:

What he said!!!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

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Back in the day, I did not use studs. As I rode more and more in many varied conditions over the whole winter season; I found them to be very valuable for maintaining control in less than perfect trail conditions.

If you are careful and do not ride in the early or late season, then you MAY not need them. :dunno: I would rather have them and not need them, than need them and not have them. Sort of like insurance, a firearm, survival tools, etc. just in case. :good:

Mark :drinks:

x2. I rode without them after using them for years when i got my new 2008 XP's. A few 360's down a hill once convinced me to go back to studs. Not to mention a little added braking resistance.

But many do ride without them. I'll take the insurance like OVR.

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I've ridden the Nytro for 2 seasons with the stock RipSaw track unstudded. I'm happy with it as is. If I need to replace the track I might go with an Ice Ripper pre-studded track. Not as much bite on ice as screw in studs, but enough grip to handle the dicey areas without the weight and risk of screw-in studs.

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Back in the day, I did not use studs. As I rode more and more in many varied conditions over the whole winter season; I found them to be very valuable for maintaining control in less than perfect trail conditions.

If you are careful and do not ride in the early or late season, then you MAY not need them. :dunno: I would rather have them and not need them, than need them and not have them. Sort of like insurance, a firearm, survival tools, etc. just in case. :good:

Mark :drinks:

I actually don;t stud because of the early and late season conditions, I studded my 05 renegade and 4500 miles later after bending a bunch fo studs on a thin snow expedition late season in Pittsburg I pulled all the studs and put another 4000+ miles on my sled without them, had to relearn to ride on lakes, dumped it on Ossipee my second or third ride without them but overall I like the sled without them.

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Trying to decide whether or not to stud the track on two new sleds. Mainly do trail riding with a little (very little) back country stuff. Any thoughts or advice is appreciated.

Had one sled with studs, and one without. Most of the time it did not make much difference, but when it did I was very sorry that BOTH

sleds were not studded.

The biggest problem I had was getting the un-studded sled on the trailer, especially when parked on

a hard packed icy road. The studded sled went right on, but the un-studded one just burned rubber on the icy road. Not fun

when you are cold and just want to get back to someplace warm!

I have also been stuck in the middle of a lake before with an un-studded track. You know, when the ice has thawed, then refrozen

smooth as glass. Put a light dusting of snow on that, and all you do is spin the track.

I'd say go with studs.

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We always pick. Wouldn't be with out them.

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Depends on track length and lug size. I think a 136 1 1/4 ripsaw be fine unstudded. Mine is studded down the center. Now my polaris has a 121 0.91 lug ,that sled should be but isn't. I had to replace that track,because last one had a tear out. I've had to drive in to bankings going uphill to get traction if trail is icy. Downhilll braking can be scary ,especially in a group. plowking

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last year i made up cherry hill with no studs 1.35 lug track my friend with studs did not make it and he could not figure out how i made it up it was so icy but i think it has alot to do with throttle control, keeping it moving in slippery conditions but if you stop it will break track easier if you know how to ride you dont need them if you dont know how to ride you will learn quick or it will hurt

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another thing to consider is if you ride rail beds with the rails still in. Often the rails are showing or just under the surface and my unstudded track rides smooth on top of the rail where studded ones are rough and can slide off.

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jay    3
Depends on track length and lug size. I think a 136 1 1/4 ripsaw be fine unstudded. Mine is studded down the center. Now my polaris has a 121 0.91 lug ,that sled should be but isn't. I had to replace that track,because last one had a tear out. I've had to drive in to bankings going uphill to get traction if trail is icy. Downhilll braking can be scary ,especially in a group. plowking

Not necessarily.........The 136" Ripsaw stinks compared to a 128 - 1.375" IMO. Unless you get perfect all snow conditions all of the time, you will be happy with studs.

Agree with studding the center only.......

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I do agree stud the center! I have 2 that have them up the sides as well,I bought them that way, I wouldnt have had them installed that way,My Cat has them 108 down the center!

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last year i made up cherry hill with no studs 1.35 lug track my friend with studs did not make it and he could not figure out how i made it up it was so icy but i think it has alot to do with throttle control, keeping it moving in slippery conditions but if you stop it will break track easier if you know how to ride you dont need them if you dont know how to ride you will learn quick or it will hurt

:nea: OK I'll weigh in on this one now MATT! Stud it down the middle as RAD said!

The friend behind you (me) was third in line & had to stop :shok: because it was so trenched out that you barely made it or i would've rear ended you!

You NEED THEM!!!! :good:

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:nea: OK I'll weigh in on this one now MATT! Stud it down the middle as RAD said!

The friend behind you (me) was third in line & had to stop :shok: because it was so trenched out that you barely made it or i would've rear ended you!

You NEED THEM!!!! :good:

you know ill stud it just savin enough to get the good ones :yahoo:

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Here's an analogy for you:

You've got all-season tires for a car and then you have dedicated snow tires. Will the car go with the all-seasons......yep.....but its a compromise between performing well in the snow and the dry. A dedicated snow tire gives the ultimate in traction in the snow but at the expense of longevity. Will the all-season get you from point A to B in the winter...most of the time yes but the one time you could have used the dedicated snow tire, you will be cursing wishing you had them. The advantages of studs far outweigh the disadvantages IMO.

I've studded both my sleds myself and haven't had one pull out in over 9,000 miles. If conditions are boney and at road crossings, I take it real easy making sure I don't spin the track. Common sense stuff. :good:

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Here's an analogy for you:

You've got all-season tires for a car and then you have dedicated snow tires. Will the car go with the all-seasons......yep.....but its a compromise between performing well in the snow and the dry. A dedicated snow tire gives the ultimate in traction in the snow but at the expense of longevity. Will the all-season get you from point A to B in the winter...most of the time yes but the one time you could have used the dedicated snow tire, you will be cursing wishing you had them. The advantages of studs far outweigh the disadvantages IMO.

I've studded both my sleds myself and haven't had one pull out in over 9,000 miles. If conditions are boney and at road crossings, I take it real easy making sure I don't spin the track. Common sense stuff. :good:

Most times it is... ride normal, and things last :good:

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2 votes for studs, I like them and wife insist on having her sled studded. Just for safety when braking and traction on icy trails. You might try the new screw in studs, I have heard good things about them.

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