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MadRam

Any Ethanol Free Gas in NH?

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So I had my first engine trouble today and had to take the sled to the dealer to be checked. Mechanic mentions to me that the ethanol in gas is reaking havoc on snowmobile engines. I have heard others blaming blown engines and other problems on ethanol. Is anyone aware of any non-ethanol gas stations in NH? I can't find any. Hopefully that's not my problem, but thought I would check if anyone knows of any ethanol free fuel sources.

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So I had my first engine trouble today and had to take the sled to the dealer to be checked. Mechanic mentions to me that the ethanol in gas is reaking havoc on snowmobile engines. I have heard others blaming blown engines and other problems on ethanol. Is anyone aware of any non-ethanol gas stations in NH? I can't find any. Hopefully that's not my problem, but thought I would check if anyone knows of any ethanol free fuel sources.

Yes, but we're closed till April. Pick up some startron or stabil marine and use the highest octane fuel you can find.

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I get all my gas at a local Sunoco and it does not advertise 10% Ethanol. I'm under the impression that the stations have to advertise the ethanol if they carry it...I hope I'm wrong because I avoid the ethanol like the plague. I also keep my sled right at 7500 rpms for most of my riding and no problems thus far in 1000 miles.

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I get all my gas at a local Sunoco and it does not advertise 10% Ethanol. I'm under the impression that the stations have to advertise the ethanol if they carry it...I hope I'm wrong because I avoid the ethanol like the plague. I also keep my sled right at 7500 rpms for most of my riding and no problems thus far in 1000 miles.

In Madison?

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In Madison?

Yep. Let me guess...ethanol?

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Yep. Let me guess...ethanol?

I guess I really didn't look, but more than likely. Great if it doesn't, it's right on the new and improved trail. What has me nervous is the bare shelves and the new sign on the pumps stating no credit cards. I hope they're sticking around!

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I guess I really didn't look, but more than likely. Great if it doesn't, it's right on the new and improved trail. What has me nervous is the bare shelves and the new sign on the pumps stating no credit cards. I hope they're sticking around!

I used a credit/debit card there earlier today. Any truth to the 10% being advertised? Anyone?

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I used a credit/debit card there earlier today. Any truth to the 10% being advertised? Anyone?

Yes, they HAVE to advertise. Good to here on the credit card thing, must have had technical difficulties.

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Yes, they HAVE to advertise. Good to here on the credit card thing, must have had technical difficulties.

:good:

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I guess I really didn't look, but more than likely. Great if it doesn't, it's right on the new and improved trail. What has me nervous is the bare shelves and the new sign on the pumps stating no credit cards. I hope they're sticking around!

You mean the place where they park trucks in front of the trail half the time, and won't donate to the club fundraisers at all just like Mcdonalds.

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Yes, they HAVE to advertise. Good to here on the credit card thing, must have had technical difficulties.

From the NH DES at http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissione...ents/ard-29.pdf

While there is no specific requirement, DES and other state agencies are recommending that

pumps be labeled appropriately to disclose the presence of ethanol blended gasoline. If in doubt,

ask the station manager or operator

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You mean the place where they park trucks in front of the trail half the time, and won't donate to the club fundraisers at all just like Mcdonalds.

I only get gas there..$12 for a 12 pack of bud light is out of hand.

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So I had my first engine trouble today and had to take the sled to the dealer to be checked. Mechanic mentions to me that the ethanol in gas is reaking havoc on snowmobile engines. I have heard others blaming blown engines and other problems on ethanol. Is anyone aware of any non-ethanol gas stations in NH? I can't find any. Hopefully that's not my problem, but thought I would check if anyone knows of any ethanol free fuel sources.

NH law mandates reformulated gas (RFG) in 4 southern counties: Merrimack, Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Strafford. MBTE is now illegal so, ethanol is used to provide additional oxygen to the fuel. It's legal to sell non-RFG in the rest of the state, but many stations have elected to go with the RFG for reasons of price or availability.

Anything built since the 1980's should handle ethanol fuel. Remember that this is our second time around with "gasohol"; it was sold here in the early 1980's. I've seen more problems with the stuff in the summer when humidity is high. The alcohol will absorb water from the air then if the container is vented. On a hot and humid summer day pour a couple tablespoons of gasohol in a dish and wait about 5-10 minutes: the fuel will be the color of skim milk. Long storage of gasohol doesn't seem to work very well, and products like Stabil will help but will not prevent separation if enough water is in the fuel. Alcohol is an excellent solvent, and does a great job of cleaning fuel tanks and fuel lines. Unfortunately, the junk all heads for your carbs. If you have an older sled and have just switched from regular gas to RFG fuel you should keep a good eye on the fuel filters.

My Arctic Cat manual says that fuel can contain up to 10% ethanol, but that the main jet must be one size larger than the jet required for regular gasoline. I figure that stock main jets are pretty fat, so I've left the stock jet in there. The jetting restriction obviously wouldn't apply to EFI models.

My experience has been that sometimes ethanol is blamed for engine problems when the "expert" either doesn't know the reason for the problem or doesn't want to admit it.

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Touche' ... in a way I have to agree with JH W. ... been running sleds since early 60's and the latest being the 03 F7 ( ya its EFI ) but my 2000' 440 and 99' Pantera 800 triple isn't ... ( of latest models here at the Ranch ) ...Most times they are what was set up by the Factory... no add on's or anything like that and they run fine ... I do use the highest I can get for Octane at the pump thats available. I have never seen a blown motor because of fuel ... but more so because the oil wasn't getting to the pistons sleves and cooking them or expanding the rings so much they expand and score thus siezing a motor would be the result...a hole in the piston could be a material cast issue of fatigue.

Now this is on orginal equipment & motor that I have had no problems with.... I can't really comment on a rebuilt as I have never needed one.. Just my 2 cents...

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NH law mandates reformulated gas (RFG) in 4 southern counties: Merrimack, Hillsborough, Rockingham, and Strafford. MBTE is now illegal so, ethanol is used to provide additional oxygen to the fuel. It's legal to sell non-RFG in the rest of the state, but many stations have elected to go with the RFG for reasons of price or availability.

Anything built since the 1980's should handle ethanol fuel. Remember that this is our second time around with "gasohol"; it was sold here in the early 1980's. I've seen more problems with the stuff in the summer when humidity is high. The alcohol will absorb water from the air then if the container is vented. On a hot and humid summer day pour a couple tablespoons of gasohol in a dish and wait about 5-10 minutes: the fuel will be the color of skim milk. Long storage of gasohol doesn't seem to work very well, and products like Stabil will help but will not prevent separation if enough water is in the fuel. Alcohol is an excellent solvent, and does a great job of cleaning fuel tanks and fuel lines. Unfortunately, the junk all heads for your carbs. If you have an older sled and have just switched from regular gas to RFG fuel you should keep a good eye on the fuel filters.

My Arctic Cat manual says that fuel can contain up to 10% ethanol, but that the main jet must be one size larger than the jet required for regular gasoline. I figure that stock main jets are pretty fat, so I've left the stock jet in there. The jetting restriction obviously wouldn't apply to EFI models.

My experience has been that sometimes ethanol is blamed for engine problems when the "expert" either doesn't know the reason for the problem or doesn't want to admit it.

Yet, when we got gas in TIlton and Errol, the pumps said 10% ethanol. My husband has been adding the Stabil to both of our sleds. THe other thing he noticed is that at some stations the premium gas is only 91 octane not 93.

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Yet, when we got gas in TIlton and Errol, the pumps said 10% ethanol. My husband has been adding the Stabil to both of our sleds. THe other thing he noticed is that at some stations the premium gas is only 91 octane not 93.

Yes, that's pretty common even in the north country. I live in Merrimack County, and when the gasohol (RFG) was first mandated some residents would travel north to Belknap County to buy regular gas, but now most stations in Belknap County sell gasohol. The dealers are forced to buy what the distributor will provide.

Do you buy your gasoline in Errol at the "Home of the Mooseburger"?

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Yes, that's pretty common even in the north country. I live in Merrimack County, and when the gasohol (RFG) was first mandated some residents would travel north to Belknap County to buy regular gas, but now most stations in Belknap County sell gasohol. The dealers are forced to buy what the distributor will provide.

Do you buy your gasoline in Errol at the "Home of the Mooseburger"?

We tried to get some at Cote's, but that was the day hubby's sled decided to die, carbs needed cleaning!!!!! Which got done as soon as we got home.

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Jackman Maine, even had the crap!

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I wish they would make the old gas this stuff has made me need new carb boots :sad:

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I wish they would make the old gas this stuff has made me need new carb boots :sad:

At least you saw the bad boots and didn't end up with a meltdown!

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Read your owners manual and see what it says about octane and ethanol. My 05 and 08 Polaris state the proper octane reading and what will hapen if you fail to. Along with this it states do not use greater than 10% ethanol. I think they have been building the engines meeting the requirment for years now.

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I said this before in other posts and I'll say it again. It's not the 10% ethenol that's the problem, it's how and for how long it's been stored. Suggestions, go to a busy station this will ensure a fresher batch of fuel, 2 use at least the specified octane, 3 use the fuel, don't let it sit around, 4 use an additive specific to ethanol. stabile marine and startron are great examples.

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Go to http://www.mobil.com/USA-English/GFM/Files...asoline_Map.pdf for a US map of mandated fuels put out by Exxon-Mobil. Pretty simple: lower population densities= regular gas, except for a few politically correct states that went over the federal regulations ( Minnesota, Washington, Oregon, etc.).

The ethanol is added to gasoline at the distributor, and because the gas will be blended with ethanol, which jacks up the octane rating, it is a low octane gas. If you're determined to buy a high octane, non-ethanol gas, then find a source for aviation gas.

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ditto - what jhwentworth said

the only time you need higher octane gas is when you've increased the compression (illegal pipe)

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