ckf

How cold is to cold?

  

55 members have voted

  1. 1. How cold is to cold to ride?

    • 20 degrees
      0
    • 10 degrees
      0
    • 0 degrees
      3
    • -10 degrees
      10
    • -20 degrees
      19
    • -30 degrees
      23


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.......

I have used electrical tape to cover areas not overlapped properly with success.

Any breakdowns or even gassing/adding oil become problematic. It takes only a few minutes for my hands to go numb and sooo long for them to get comfortable again despite handwarmers...

Be sure to carry some blue duct tape. It is flexable and sticky to -40 degrees F. Use it on any exposed areas of skin to help keep from getting frost bite and to keep the wind from getting into your clothing.

Also, carry some packets of chemical hand warmers to help your hand grip heaters keep your hands warm. You can also use them in the toes of your boots if your toes are cold.

Be sure to also have an emergency survival kit just in case. :good:

Never depend on a cell phone to get you out of trouble!

Mark :drinks:

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I used to ride at any temp, but now 70 degrees in april is about right. :drinks:

Sucks when you spend all day trying to regain the feeling in your fingers...

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Rode in Monts Valin 2 years ago.... 30 below all week.... Best trails, 25 feet wide and straight, easy to log many miles but due to the cold only logged about 800 miles for the week. Trucks wouldn't start but sleds did... one guy with us rode a 05 ski-doo MXZ X 800 with the tiny winshield and no gauntlets... he had a tought week and ended up buying new gloves, gauntlets, windproof backlava, higher windshield..etc......spent lots of money and still had the wind pounding his chest all week.... too cold to try to swap windshields while we were there.

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I used to ride at any temp, but now 70 degrees in april is about right. :drinks:

Sucks when you spend all day trying to regain the feeling in your fingers...

It is a bitch when you get OLD, isn't it? :tease:

Remember that trip we did up into Canada when the temperature never got over -15? :shok:

Mark :drinks:

p.s. I am headed out tomorrow morning to be sure my new equipment (helmet sheld) is up to the task. :good:

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Looking at the GMAX 44S SPC Flip-Up Helmet. Would love a flip up helmet. Any idea if this one is as good/better than the BRP helmet? Is flip-up a novelty, or really useful? It's my BIRTHDAY this month, and want to give WIFEY a strong suggestion of what to get me. :good:

buy an HJC if your going modular if only because you can find parts and shields for it locally. the BRP helmet is a personal preference, people either love them or absolutely hate them I've ridden with people who feel both ays.

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I don't think it can be too cold, you just have to be prepared and have the right equipment like Mark pointed out, and plan your day accordingally. I've been riding in the NEK and Pittsburg when its been in the -20's. I usually can tell it getting colder when I have to chip the ice away from my breath exhaust tubes on my Ski doo modular just to breath. I made the mistake one year not wearing the supplied wind deflector that came with helmet. I got frost bite on both cheek bones where the moisture from from breath leaked out around my face piece, and my mask froze to my face. boy did that hurt. We went to Indian Stream Eatery that evening to ease the pain, they lost their heat due to some frozen pipes so they had some small heaters placed around. You could see your breath playing pool, but the funny thing was I couldn't feel the cold :drinks: -35F on the trucks thermometer on the way back to camp that evening.

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I've ridden in -30, and I have pretty decent gear, but I thought it was to cold, and as OT says, if you end up having and issue, your frigging dead!

I have started out on days at - 20 and warms to -5 or so, I can deal with that.

Then when the temp gets to +10 it's a damm heat wave.

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I like to ride when it is above zero. More worried about the sled then myself. I usually ride with helmet,no head covering underneath, I seldom turn on the handwarmers, thumbwarmers and no heated shield unless it fogs up. Last year riding in subzero temps. my eyelashes,eyelids, moustache tried to freeze to my face. Next week is suppose to be slighty warmer. plowking

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I used to say I could handle any temperature, but the ride about 3-4 years ago into Canada changed it all for me. We arrived in La Patrie, just north of Chartierville, which is the first town after crossing into Canada from Pittsburg. That day it was -33 in the morning. We opened the door to a restraunt and it was as if opening the door to a kitchen freezer. Condensation rushes out the door and instantly forms as ice on the door. At -30 degrees, any humidity in the air freezes and falls as a micro molecule of snow. That day we picked up a near dusting of frozen humidity. CRAZY. I got frost bite on my neck that day in a matter of seconds riding down the trail when my balaclava shifted and exposed a small area of skin. I instantly felt a burn and that was it. The spot turned purple to almost black and remained noticeable for weeks. Frostbite hurts, dont let anyone fool you! I wont ride below -30 again! Thats my take on whats too cold to ride-

Wayno

Edited by Revme

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I always think "What if?"

If you are alone especially...what if the sled dies @ -20 and it's 20 miles to the truck / heat?

What if you have an accident @ -10 or -20? That's bad news.

I prefer riding in 0 and above. Damn, 0 is cold enough for sure. Call me a wimp.

I was riding solo on a weekday once with the temps at -30 and had the carbs freeze up. I was somewhere around Hells Gate,as it turned out on a closed trail.Not a good feeling.I had my gps with me so I knew exactly where they were going to find the body.20 miles from errol.I usually cary a -30 gore-tex sleeping bag and sherpa snowshoes.I had neither, new sled and all.I became sweatsoaked trying to start the sled,very sinking feeling.I peeled the saddlebags and started walking.The gps showed I was headed the wrong way(towards diamond)I turned around and when I got back to my sled I gave it a pull and it started.OOOh what a feeling!I have been marking camps (places of shelter)on my gps ever since.This incident and a couple of other mechanical failures(broken steering rod ends)have taken all the fun out of riding alone.RiDE PREPARED TO SPEND THE NIGHT WHERE YOUR SLED BREAKS DOWN!

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If you have the right equipment, it is never too cold. I was in Canada a couple years ago, morning low was -45. It was chilly, but I was never cold. My Doo modular helmet was though, the vent tubes kept freezing up restricting my breathing...lol

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I like to ride when it is above zero. More worried about the sled then myself. I usually ride with helmet,no head covering underneath, I seldom turn on the handwarmers, thumbwarmers and no heated shield unless it fogs up. Last year riding in subzero temps. my eyelashes,eyelids, moustache tried to freeze to my face. Next week is suppose to be slighty warmer. plowking

We rode West Yellow Stone durring the "cold snap of 96" It was 30 to 45 degrees below durring the day and colder at night.....We had to dress for the South Pole!!! But with only 4 days to ride ....you ride!!! Thank god the rental sleds were kept inside with fuel additive or they wouldn't have run!!!! Oh and the trucks were left running all night or the oil would've froze solid....Metal also becomes very brittle at 50 below...one guy hit a Buffalo nugget and snapped his ski in half......! You would see the Northern Lights many times when it got that cold back in the 70's!!!!!! And nothing is worse then a helmit frozen to your face hair then when its froze to your skin.TOO!!!!..OUCCCHHHH!

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I ride with a Carhartt Arctic Coverall (good to -40), an HJC full face helmet. I was ok down to 10 degrees at 20-70 mph, except for my cheap boots. Im new to sledding and learned 4-5 things on my last trip alone :)

I was the only guy in our group that had a huge bag of beef jerky to quell our hunger on a 5 hour trip, I passed the bag around with a little bit of pride :good: Everyone was like HOOAH! It was Homemade from Some friends in the deep south.

Edited by SledNH

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If you have the right equipment, it is never too cold. I was in Canada a couple years ago, morning low was -45. It was chilly, but I was never cold. My Doo modular helmet was though, the vent tubes kept freezing up restricting my breathing...lol

It seems that every year on the first sub-zero ride I think I am having a heart-attack until I remember the freezing issue with my modular mask.At -20 it frequently needs the ice buildup in the tubes and side exhaust vents cleaned out.

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-20 for me.....after that it's just not much fun.My choko gear is good stuff but my 20 year old sorrels and cheap helmet start to show colder than that.

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My try some vaseline to keep the helmet vents from icing up. Nice to have a fancooled sled with you when it gets really cold. Helps to warm hands and feet.

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When you worry about freezing to death if your sled breaks down, it's too cold to ride.

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We've gone out at -26*F good day riding, not a lot of people on the trail and the warming hut always has good Turkey soup.

What makes me laugh about some of these temperatures now is, when I go to Alabama for work some of the test we run are in Temperature Chambers set to -40* C (-40* F). It feels odd to have some of my coldest weather gear with me to wear in Alabama in August. :wacko:

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This morning is too cold.

When I was younger if the sled would start I'd ride,nowadays much below -10 and my mangina ices up.

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I rode last night in the OVSC area, and when I returned home it was -20. That's cold enough for me. Good job on the tracks!!!!!! :good:

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Be sure to carry some blue duct tape. It is flexable and sticky to -40 degrees F. Use it on any exposed areas of skin to help keep from getting frost bite and to keep the wind from getting into your clothing.

I'll pick some of the blue tape up for the pack. The electrical tape was what I had that day and when applied in the warmth of the truck's cab (and kept warm and supple by my face once applied) it worked fine. It had the added bonus of making me look like I was getting ready for a football game. I did wonder about the affect of the adhesive and lack of brethability after being on the skin for ~ 8 hrs but when I took it off there were no issues.

I carry the hand/toe warmers in my pack but have never got to the pont I needed them.

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This morning is too cold.

When I was younger if the sled would start I'd ride,nowadays much below -10 and my mangina ices up.

Mangina, thats funny

Went skiing last night, -4 at Wachusett. I think with anything, if you have the right equipment and you are prepared, you will be fine.

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My daughter,son-in-law just got back from a two day trip. It was 38 below when they got to camp,the pipes were froze in the crawl space. They got the woodstove roaring. Only saw about a dozen sleds when they went for a ride,they did 100 miles. One sled and the truck didn't want to start. They had an idea it was cold when they saw trucks,logging equipment idling all nite. They had to watch for hyfax wear as snow was dry from cold temps. plowking

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It is a bitch when you get OLD, isn't it? :tease:

Remember that trip we did up into Canada when the temperature never got over -15? :shok:

Mark :drinks:

p.s. I am headed out tomorrow morning to be sure my new equipment (helmet sheld) is up to the task. :good:

That was a good day, but it was COLD!

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