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Tucker Terra Track question


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#1 NHsledin

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 12:31 PM

Our club is looking at getting a new Tucker with the terra track for the 2012/2013 season. We would like to know what you think of the terra tracks. How do they do on hills? What about icy conditions? I see that most have a winch and lockers to help in the conditions. What about road use? We would like to drive on the road to get around the swamps that we can't cross. Do they hold up? How many miles do you have on them?

Edited by NHsledin, 10 March 2011 - 01:49 PM.

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#2 Oldtimer

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 01:17 PM

They work pretty well. Certainly, the benifits outweigh the negatives when compared to steel cleat tracks.
They ride on asphalt almost as smooth as a tire. Our tucker had a few issues with drive lugs, but that was fixed and hasn't been an issue since. They seem to be holding up well as far as tread wear.
With a winch and lockers, it's the best choice. If you have rails to groom, it's the only choice.
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#3 Rock On

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 01:18 PM

If you have lots of hills and icy conditions this is not the machine for you, Yes they do travel down the road nice (but who grooms the road) and you can travel in low snow conditions. We have tried them a few different time on our trail system (Gorham Area) and they just do not work as a primary machine for our terrain. The tracks are not very repairable compared to a cleated machines where you can replace parts of them. Not to mention the are extremely expensive for what you get, the hydraulic system is very small in comparison to other machines everything is driven by drive shafts much like and old 4 x 4 truck. Parts can sometimes be easy to get at your local Napa store. I would look at some of the other machines out there Pisten Bully has some of the best service and parts stock in the business, do some shopping and try them out on your trail system if possible, I know Cooks does not usually drop off a machine to try but others do..

Edited by Rock On, 10 March 2011 - 01:22 PM.


#4 NHsledin

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 01:58 PM

We already have a 99 Tucker with the steel cleat tracks. We also have an old 69 Tucker...the poor old girl is done for grooming. We love what the Tucker has done for us. I don't think a Pisten Bully would be the right tool for the job. We are trying to reorganize our assets and offer a better trail with more Tucker coverage. The trail systems, where terra Tucker would be used, is pretty flat with only maybe 2 small hills and only 2 that could cause problems. Then again, we have seen icy spots disappear using the Tucker. The area has many swamps that there is no way around and homes that are very close to the trail. One house is maybe 10 feet off the trail. There's no way we could widen these trails but then again...we have the swamp to deal with. We where think we could drive down the road for about 1 mile and pick the trail back up. I think out of that 1 mile that maybe 500 feet is a dirt road.

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#5 KD@sdr

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 02:35 PM

We already have a 99 Tucker with the steel cleat tracks. We also have an old 69 Tucker...the poor old girl is done for grooming. We love what the Tucker has done for us. I don't think a Pisten Bully would be the right tool for the job. We are trying to reorganize our assets and offer a better trail with more Tucker coverage. The trail systems, where terra Tucker would be used, is pretty flat with only maybe 2 small hills and only 2 that could cause problems. Then again, we have seen icy spots disappear using the Tucker. The area has many swamps that there is no way around and homes that are very close to the trail. One house is maybe 10 feet off the trail. There's no way we could widen these trails but then again...we have the swamp to deal with. We where think we could drive down the road for about 1 mile and pick the trail back up. I think out of that 1 mile that maybe 500 feet is a dirt road.

Our Club has loved our Tuckers. Easy to maintain, fuel efficient, and one of the easier machines for a person to operate. We've had very little trouble over the years. Only negative we say is they don't pull corners in very well and the front blade should be used sparingly. We recommend them. We trade them after about 5000 hrs.

#6 Oldtimer

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 03:27 PM

Our Prinoth (Same basic design as the Piston Bully) could not make a hill on our system...dropped the drag, tried again...nope.
It was pulled up with the Tucker Terra, then the Tucker went down, hooked up the drag, and drove that up.
Of course, the Prinoth has full rubber tracks like the Terra. It's used on the railbed, and I was very surprised to learn I really enjoy running it. It is the machine for those long straight trails like the railbed. Stays running dead straight where the Tucker needs to be "driven" constantly.
Out in the woods, there is NO replacement for a Tucker. Skid-steer twin tracks just can't go where the Tucker can.
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#7 Rock On

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 04:00 PM

Don't get me wrong I think Tuckers do have thier place sounds like your trail system is not full of steep hills so a rubber track Tucker would work good!
I tried one a couple of years ago on our trails system and it worked ok until we got to some of our steep spots we had to put on the lockers and empty the drag but made it up and over.
Some body needs to come up with a track that can change from rubber when you drive or cross roads and be able to switch it to steel cleats when it is steep or icy.

#8 AUTOMOVER

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 08:54 PM

We already have a 99 Tucker with the steel cleat tracks. We also have an old 69 Tucker...the poor old girl is done for grooming. We love what the Tucker has done for us. I don't think a Pisten Bully would be the right tool for the job. We are trying to reorganize our assets and offer a better trail with more Tucker coverage. The trail systems, where terra Tucker would be used, is pretty flat with only maybe 2 small hills and only 2 that could cause problems. Then again, we have seen icy spots disappear using the Tucker. The area has many swamps that there is no way around and homes that are very close to the trail. One house is maybe 10 feet off the trail. There's no way we could widen these trails but then again...we have the swamp to deal with. We where think we could drive down the road for about 1 mile and pick the trail back up. I think out of that 1 mile that maybe 500 feet is a dirt road.

Knowing the trail system I think you would be good with the terra tracks, but saying that I would make sure it is equiped with a winch.

#9 smallengineguy

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:08 PM

The lockers make the difference and the Cummins runs strong. Too bad the interior parts are so cheaply made compared to the drivetrain.

#10 nhshiftrider

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Posted 10 March 2011 - 09:48 PM

We have some crazy twisty hills here and our rubber tracked terra handles them well.

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#11 rivercat

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 12:26 AM

I feel we are in "Terra country" down here,,,,, lockers on both ends are smart,,, a winch receiver on both ends of the Tucker are also smart, on glare ice the rubber sometimes has a better chance of biting than steel,,, the crabbing action around tight turns is an asset on the super tight trails,,,, if you were doing trails that were able to allow 80 mph on a sled, than I may feel differently,, in other words possibly the northern clubs are best off with a Bully,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, but the southern clubs do not have Northern trails,,, another IMPORTANT consideration is your clubs budget ,,,,,,, AND IF GIA is able to fund their 60% of your choice of machine. We are running a Terra 1000 bought with under 1000 hrs with a brand new 1608 Mogul Master with a brush bar and total cost to GIA was UNDER $29,000. Our other large groomer cost LESS. I learned as a kid if I asked for $5 I usually got it,,, but if I asked for $20 my odds were less...

#12 KD@sdr

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 07:13 AM

I feel we are in "Terra country" down here,,,,, lockers on both ends are smart,,, a winch receiver on both ends of the Tucker are also smart, on glare ice the rubber sometimes has a better chance of biting than steel,,, the crabbing action around tight turns is an asset on the super tight trails,,,, if you were doing trails that were able to allow 80 mph on a sled, than I may feel differently,, in other words possibly the northern clubs are best off with a Bully,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, but the southern clubs do not have Northern trails,,, another IMPORTANT consideration is your clubs budget ,,,,,,, AND IF GIA is able to fund their 60% of your choice of machine. We are running a Terra 1000 bought with under 1000 hrs with a brand new 1608 Mogul Master with a brush bar and total cost to GIA was UNDER $29,000. Our other large groomer cost LESS. I learned as a kid if I asked for $5 I usually got it,,, but if I asked for $20 my odds were less...

The SDR club... a northern club... has 2 Tucker 2000s and a Prinorth Husky. Much less money than a Bully and when it comes to the long runs the Tucker goes just as well or better. It's also the most fuel efficient which is going to be a big issue if prices don't change (or gets worse).

#13 NHsledin

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 09:32 AM

I feel we are in "Terra country" down here,,,,, lockers on both ends are smart,,, a winch receiver on both ends of the Tucker are also smart, on glare ice the rubber sometimes has a better chance of biting than steel,,, the crabbing action around tight turns is an asset on the super tight trails,,,, if you were doing trails that were able to allow 80 mph on a sled, than I may feel differently,, in other words possibly the northern clubs are best off with a Bully,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, but the southern clubs do not have Northern trails,,, another IMPORTANT consideration is your clubs budget ,,,,,,, AND IF GIA is able to fund their 60% of your choice of machine. We are running a Terra 1000 bought with under 1000 hrs with a brand new 1608 Mogul Master with a brush bar and total cost to GIA was UNDER $29,000. Our other large groomer cost LESS. I learned as a kid if I asked for $5 I usually got it,,, but if I asked for $20 my odds were less...


Thanks. We would be using RTP and GIA. We are planning on selling the 69 Tucker and another piece of equipment. If approved, we should be in good shape. The 1000's are much harder to find used then the 2000. The 2000 may just be a little to big. We already have a "spare" 1608 Mogul Master (without brush bar) that we used for our 69 Tucker.

Thanks all...anything else please post.

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#14 Legend_GT_600SDI

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 10:08 AM

we have a 1000 and a 2000. I wish we had two 2000's, MUCH more power and room inside the 2000, but not all that much bigger on the outside as far as clearance goes. I think the 1000s' weak spot is the hydraulic system, in that it is slow to respond, although it may be OUR machine.... Neither of them like ice. A winch reciever on both ends is a MUST. We also have a platform that mounts to the front of the 1000, so we can get higher off the ground with the pole saws when we do trail clearing in the fall.

Edited by Legend_GT_600SDI, 11 March 2011 - 10:14 AM.


#15 NHsledin

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 10:21 AM

I think the 1000s' weak spot is the hydraulic system, in that it is slow to respond, although it may be OUR machine....


Ours seem fine.

We also have a platform that mounts to the front of the 1000, so we can get higher off the ground with the pole saws when we do trail clearing in the fall.


Brash bar on the drag works awesome! Groom and cut at the same time.

Edited by NHsledin, 11 March 2011 - 10:22 AM.

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#16 Legend_GT_600SDI

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 10:27 AM

Brash bar on the drag works awesome! Groom and cut at the same time.
[/quote]

That would be another option too, do they make a hydraulic folding bar?

#17 NHsledin

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 11:13 AM

Not sure if "they" make one but I have heard of clubs making their own.

The bars work best when really cold out. We fold ours down late in the season.

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#18 slushpup

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Posted 11 March 2011 - 09:35 PM

I feel we are in "Terra country" down here,,,,, lockers on both ends are smart,,, a winch receiver on both ends of the Tucker are also smart, on glare ice the rubber sometimes has a better chance of biting than steel,,, the crabbing action around tight turns is an asset on the super tight trails,,,, if you were doing trails that were able to allow 80 mph on a sled, than I may feel differently,, in other words possibly the northern clubs are best off with a Bully,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, but the southern clubs do not have Northern trails,,, another IMPORTANT consideration is your clubs budget ,,,,,,, AND IF GIA is able to fund their 60% of your choice of machine. We are running a Terra 1000 bought with under 1000 hrs with a brand new 1608 Mogul Master with a brush bar and total cost to GIA was UNDER $29,000. Our other large groomer cost LESS. I learned as a kid if I asked for $5 I usually got it,,, but if I asked for $20 my odds were less...

If you are going to do any "road riding" the Terra is the way to go,The steel cleats and ice picks dont like pavement much.I feel steel cleats climb better than rubber.That said rubber tracks react much better to stumps and rocks than steel.As far as Bullys,Huskys and the like.......We had a impromptu groomer rodeo this winter on a super steep straight hill in our system one night this winter.Steel 2000 scampered right up,Rubber 1000 got hung 3/4 and a demo 180 with aluminum cleats pushed it and its drag up and over.After that night All I wanted was a 180 till Later in the season when the stories of getting hung up on the high side of the corners,Lack of turning while climbing,And a somewhat scary story of a spinout on a hill which turned into a spirited downhill slide with the aluminum cleats acting as skis....
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